Upcoming Conferences and Workshops

All events are open to the public.


Everyday Evasions: Space and Strategy in Sex Markets in Colonial India

Lecture by Zoya Sameen, doctoral student of History at University of Chicago, hosted by The Nicholson Center for British Studies and The Newberry Library’s British History Seminar

The historiography of prostitution in colonial India has often sidelined the routine life of sexual commerce in favor of approaching it as a site of wider transformations having to do with race, governance, and scientific discourse. This paper shifts attention toward historicizing prostitution as a set of practices and activities, and aims to present an ‘everyday’ history of prostitution in colonial India from the late nineteenth to the early twentieth century (c. 1860-1911). Situated against the historical context of prostitution regulation in empire, this paper examines how various participants in sex markets (soldiers, civilian men, and prostitutes) strategized their approaches to sex-exchanges in order to evade official surveillance, police action, and compulsory registration. This paper further considers how local geographies, transport technologies, and environmental conditions altered configurations of prostitution across Indian towns and cities. Drawing on colonial records, missionary collections, and vernacular newspaper reports, this paper aims to present a history of prostitution in colonial India not as a concept or in terms of a discourse, but as an everyday practice that traces the contest between what is prescribed and what is practiced in relation to mobility, negotiation, and tactics of resistance.

Newberry Scholarly Seminars papers are pre-circulated. For a copy of the paper, email scholarlyseminars@newberry.org. Please do not request a paper unless you plan to attend.

Dates: 
Friday, February 28, 2020 - 3:00pm
Towners Fellows' Lounge, The Newberry Library, 60 West Walton Street

Worlds of Pleasure: Making Sense Between Place, Painting, Poetry, and Performance

Lecture by Dipti Khera, Assistant Professor of Art History, New York University, hosted by COSAS

The idea of pleasure as a pivotal tenet of ideal kingship and the practice of pleasure by courtly communities to formulate and deepen personal and political bonds gains momentum in eighteenth-century South Asia. Paintings, palaces, poetry, and performance create images of pleasures that are easily read as portraits of decadence and triviality of Indian rajas. An inquiry into the dynamic communities formed around associated spaces, images, and texts that sought to create jagvilās, a “world of pleasure,” in the renowned Jagnivas lake-palace at the Rajput court of Udaipur opens our minds to new interpretations and neglected vantage points and archives. The intertwining of pleasure and power, and of the joys of Gods and the delights of Men entices us to ask how we might constitute an art history of pleasure in South Asia. The painted worlds of complete satiation and sensorial excess—friends and frenemies bonding in peculiarly affective ways over the enjoyment of architecture, gardens, music, and food—create images of convivial parties, while shaping in subtle and direct ways courtly connoisseurs, ethics, politics, and aesthetics.

Dates: 
Wednesday, March 4, 2020 - 5:00pm
Foster 103

17th Annual South Asia Graduate Student Conference: “Reception, Tradition, and Canonization: Pasts and Presents in South Asia”

Keynote Speakers:

Rosalind O’Hanlon (University of Oxford)

Akshaya Mukul (Independent researcher and journalist)

This conference aims to examine traditions in premodern and modern South Asia and seeks to interrogate formations of knowledge about traditions through processes of transmission and canonization. A focus on canon formation – literary, religious, philosophical, and political – reveals underlying modes of thinking that inform the consolidation of traditions, and allows for a deconstruction of what comes to be understood as normative knowledge. The conference will bring together graduate students who are interested in the different life-stages of traditions and canons, and in the work of agents who participate in shaping, carrying, maintaining, and expanding them. Thus, it will participate in ongoing scholarship on the construction of South Asian traditions, identities, and communities.

Organizing Committee:
Ayelet Kotler, South Asian Languages and Civilizations
Akshara Ravishankar, South Asian Languages and Civilizations
Itamar Ramot, South Asian Languages and Civilizations
Faculty Advisor: Anand Venkatkrishnan

The full schedule can be found here.

Dates: 
Thursday, March 5, 2020 - 10:00am to Friday, March 6, 2020 - 6:00pm
Swift Common Room