Past Events

Old World, New World; Old Ways, New Ways: Libraries and Cultural Property

South Asia Seminar: Graham Shaw, British Library

[Celebrating the Career of James Nye Dinner Following, Classics 110]

In this talk, Graham Shaw will offer a review of the ways in which South Asian collections in the West - Europe and America - have developed from the 18th to the 20th centuries in the light of changing historical circumstances, relationships and technologies. Shaw comes to Chicago to join in honoring the many contributions of South Asia bibliographer Jim Nye, who will retire from UChicago this fall. Shaw credits Nye with devising an ethical approach to collections and cultural property and will discuss how the field has changed over the course of both men’s careers.

Dates: 
Thursday, October 4, 2018 - 5:00pm
Foster 103

TAPSA: “‘Marwa Na Dena’: Reporting Between the Marginal and the Military”

Ayesha Mullah, doctoral candidate in the Department of Anthropology

Limited critical scholarship on the Pakistani military establishment has documented its penetration into virtually every sphere of public life, including the bureaucracy and the media, showing how through its allies, with both direct and indirect decision making, the military effectively dominates Pakistani society (Siddiqa 2007). This paper analyzes the ways in which the shadow of the deep state featured in my dissertation fieldwork among news media professionals in Karachi and Islamabad. The paper focuses on the shifts in tone, the anxious laughter and the lengthy pauses that verbose journalists adopted when they would perform an inarticulate critique of the military. Such enactments rest upon the very real dangers of straying past the limits of investigative inquiry in Pakistan, particularly when presented with the fate of their colleagues pursuing critical leads on military activities. How then do Pakistani news media journalists, occupying diverse class positions in professional hierarchies, negotiate their journalistic ethics while operating in a climate of uncertainty that has both fed and threatened their daily work? Based on a series of in-depth interviews, this paper will analyze the politics of producing sensationalist news and the subsequent self-regulation that media professionals must practice in a volatile sociopolitical environment.

Dates: 
Thursday, May 31, 2018 - 5:00pm
Foster 103

TAPSA: Marwa Na Dena’: Reporting Between the Marginal and the Military

Ayesha Mullah, doctoral candidate in the Department of Anthropology

Limited critical scholarship on the Pakistani military establishment has documented its penetration into virtually every sphere of public life, including the bureaucracy and the media, showing how through its allies, with both direct and indirect decision making, the military effectively dominates Pakistani society (Siddiqa 2007). This paper analyzes the ways in which the shadow of the deep state featured in my dissertation fieldwork among news media professionals in Karachi and Islamabad. The paper focuses on the shifts in tone, the anxious laughter and the lengthy pauses that verbose journalists adopted when they would perform an inarticulate critique of the military. Such enactments rest upon the very real dangers of straying past the limits of investigative inquiry in Pakistan, particularly when presented with the fate of their colleagues pursuing critical leads on military activities. How then do Pakistani news media journalists, occupying diverse class positions in professional hierarchies, negotiate their journalistic ethics while operating in a climate of uncertainty that has both fed and threatened their daily work? Based on a series of in-depth interviews, this paper will analyze the politics of producing sensationalist news and the subsequent self-regulation that media professionals must practice in a volatile sociopolitical environment.

Dates: 
Thursday, May 31, 2018 - 5:00pm
Foster 103

Climate Change and Asia

Asia is central to the causes, responses, and implications of climate change. This symposium explores climate policy and environmental challenges across East, Southeast, and South Asia, from water politics and renewable energy to sustainable tourism in the Anthropocene. Sponsored by: "Studies in Climate Change: The Limits of the Numerical," a Mellon Foundation Project at the Franke Institute for the Humanities

Dates: 
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 9:30am to 5:30pm
The Franke Institute, JRL S-118

Chicago Tamil Forum: “Mass Publicity and Mediation in Tamil Nadu, India"

This three-day workshop aims to expand our understandings of mass mediation, publicity, and the political in this part of south India by focusing on the expansive and diverse ways through which public life in Tamil Nadu is mediated.
See http://chicagotamilforum.uchicago.edu for more information.

Dates: 
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 9:30am to Saturday, May 26, 2018 - 3:30pm

TAPSA: "Dancing Corporate: Shifting Transnational Patronage in Indian Contemporary Art Worlds”

Ameera Nimjee, doctoral candidate in the Department of Music (Ethnomusicology)

This paper explores the patronage of Indian dance by multinational "corporate houses" and virtual communities, underscored by the transnational travel of capital in and beyond South Asia. This paper explores how technological and telecommunications companies such as Nokia, NASSCOM, and IBM negotiate contracts with artists to perform and produce affective capital at events, product launches, and through media platforms. The paper focuses on Indian contemporary dance as a case study in the investigation of transnational corporate patronage. Practitioners define the form as one of high art that is visually similar to world traditions of modern dance, in which they draw on abstract movement vocabularies to express responses to issues. Also explored are the aesthetic, kinesthetic, and fiscal mobilities of practitioners within the confines of corporate contracts, and how these contracts challenge national and transnational notions of citizenship in the patronage of Indian art worlds at large.

Dates: 
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 5:00pm
Foster 103

New Medium, New Historiography: Re-Narrating Islamic Pasts in India through VCDs

The formulation of history in late colonial India and the crystallization of Hindu Nationhood are deeply enmeshed. Indian historiography was rewritten at that time to advance a widely acclaimed standard of a Hindu nation which excluded non-Hindus and in particular the large Muslim minority in the subcontinent, from the nation’s ethos and past. In sovereign India, this historiography was articulated by the visual mainstream media that generally emphasized the Hinduised past and present and defined Indian Muslims’ past through narratives of historical and genealogical estrangement. These narratives contributed to the formation of what Dipesh Chakravarty termed a “historical wound”.[i] This presentation addresses yet another historiography to remedy and negotiate this “wound” through a new medium that targets the Muslim niche market in India: the under-regulated arena of Video Compact Discs (VCDs). This decade-old medium re-writes Indo-Islamic history and challenges the ways the Islamic past is habitually portrayed and visually imagined, as well as the discipline of modern historiography itself.
[i] Dipesh Chakravarty, “History and the Politics of Recognition”, in Theorising the Present – Essays for Patha Chatterjee, eds. Anjan Ghosh et al. (New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2011), 21-34.

Dates: 
Tuesday, May 15, 2018 - 12:30pm
Foster 103

Tackling Tantrāloka

South Asia Seminar: Alexis Sanderson, University of Oxford, All Souls College, Faculty member

Professor Sanderson will discuss his long-term project to edit, translate, and write a commentary on the Tantrāloka, Abhinavagupta monumental treatise on the Tantras, and in doing so will seek to explain the genesis and purpose of his work.

Dates: 
Thursday, May 10, 2018 - 5:00pm
Foster 103

Raga Malika: A Garland of Ragas

A Spring recital by the University of Chicago’s South Asian Music Ensemble. You are cordially invited to attend the South Asian Music Ensemble’s spring recital, entitled “Raga Malika: A Garland of Ragas.” This full two-hour concert will include a large selection of traditional compositions from North and South Indian classical music, focusing on the juxtaposition of various ragas and talas. The recital will feature vocal and instrumental music, and includes sitar, harmonium, violin, bamboo flute, slide guitar, tabla and mridangam percussion, and kathak dance.

Dates: 
Saturday, May 5, 2018 - 7:30pm
Logan Center for the Arts, Performance Penthouse

20th Annual Michicagoan Conference: Significations of Modality and Value

With a keynote address by Hirokazu Miyazaki, Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Cornell University, titled: “The Gift of Internationalism: Persons, Things, and the Power of Exchange in U.S.-Japan Citizen Diplomacy”

Now in its 20th year, the Michicagoan Graduate Student Conference in Linguistic Anthropology serves as a forum for scholars attuned to the emergent production of linguistic, cultural, social, and otherwise material phenomena via diverse semiotic processes.

The conference is pleased to present papers that take semiotic approaches to “value” and “modality” in their various instantiations across heterogeneous semantic and disciplinary fields. Through this theme, participants will attend to relations between and among linguistic codes; their sociopragmatic uses-in(- and -as)-context across variously-scaled discursive types (utterances, typified genres, registers); the kinds of relations so expressed (and made expressable); their by-degrees codifications (linguistically, legally, habitually, institutionally); and the entailments of these relations in subsequent uptake.

For more information, please contact the event organizers at jdbabcock@uchicago.edu or rhoward3@uchicago.edu.

Dates: 
Friday, May 4, 2018 (All day) to Saturday, May 5, 2018 (All day)
Classics 110

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