Past TAPSA Talks

TAPSA Seminar: Making Minor Genres a Major Issue in Telugu Poetics

Lecture given by Jamal Jones, PhD Candidate, South Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago

Starting in the 13th century, the poets and poeticians of Andhra began speaking of cāṭuprabandhas (pleasing compositions). Comparing these works to major Telugu prabandhas or Sanskrit mahākāvyas, poeticians and more recent literary historians have often dismissed these cāṭuprabandha forms as minor genres. This paper attempts to throw some light on how these genres were defined and why they would have been worth defining. Ultimately, I'll argue that the category indexes new poetic forms that had become the main (if not major) work of poetry in Andhra.

Dates: 
Thursday, April 7, 2016 - 4:30am
Foster 103

TAPSA Seminar: From the Maṇipravāḷaṃ(s) of Malayalam to the Language of Kerala

Lecture by Ellen Ambrosone, PhD Candidate, South Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago

In the middle of the nineteenth century, Malayalis began to produce grammars as part of bhāṣāpariṣkāraṃ, or the modernization of Malayalam. Two of these grammars, Kēraḷa Kaumudi (1878) by Kovunni Nedungadi [Kōvunni Neṭuṅṅāṭi] and the Kēraḷapāṇinīyaṃ (1896) by A. R. Rajaraja Varma [E. Ār. Rājarājavarmma], grapple with how to engage with the European grammatical models produced in the first part of the nineteenth century. In this presentation I argue that their perspectives on the history of the language and their critical engagement with the grammarians that came before them occasioned a refashioning of linguistic epistemes by the end of the nineteenth century. Formerly studied and taught through the grammatical lenses of Tamil and Sanskrit, it is only when polyglot Malayali grammarians engaged with European models of grammatical analysis that Malayāḷabhāṣa came into its own.

Dates: 
Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 4:30am
Foster 103

TAPSA Seminar: Breaking Form: The Urdu Medical Periodical & Its Readers

Lecture by Sabrina Datoo, PhD Candidate, History, University of Chicago

The Urdu medical periodical appeared as a new form for the circulation of medical knowledge in the middle of the nineteenth century. By the early twentieth century, these periodicals began to give voice to their readers through columns on medical advice. In so doing, they introduced the symptom to a broad public, as an object of scrutiny and a source of self-fashioning. This paper seeks to trace the voice of the ill reader as it moved out of the clinic and personal correspondence and into a public domain mediated by editors, medical specialists and other ill readers.

Dates: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 4:30am
Foster 103

“Ratnākaraśānti and Jñānaśrīmitra on Consciousness, Error, and Buddhahood: An Eleventh Century Buddhist Debate”

TAPSA Speaker: David Tomlinson
Ratnākaraśānti (ca.970-1045) and Jñānaśrīmitra (11th century) are two philosophical luminaries of the late period of Indian Buddhist philosophy. Both idealist philosophers at the university of Vikramaśīla, they were nevertheless embittered opponents: Ratnākaraśānti had argued on philosophical and buddhalogical grounds that consciousness must ultimately be contentless (nirākāra), while in his longest, most detailed works, Jñānaśrīmitra takes his colleague to task for thinking contentless consciousness is possible. Instead, Jñānaśrīmitra defends what he calls the Sākāravāda, or the (perhaps orthodox) position that consciousness is by its very definition consciousness of something, and that content is thus real and indubitable. The speaker David Tomlinson will introduce these figures, their respective stances toward the history of Indian Buddhist philosophy, and their central arguments. Tomlinson will also consider the way their respective positions are shaped by very different understandings of Buddhahood.

Dates: 
Thursday, October 6, 2016 - 4:30pm
Foster 103

TAPSA Speaker: Gautham Reddy

TAPSA Speaker: Gautham Reddy

Dates: 
Thursday, December 1, 2016 - 4:30pm
Foster 103

Pages