Past Conferences and Workshops

Thirteen Festivals: A Ritual Year in Bengal

Lecture by Ralph W. Nicholas
Presented by International House Global Voices Author Night

Ralph W. Nicholas is the William Rainey Harper Professor Emeritus at the University of Chicago. He was President of the American Institute of Indian Studies and now is Chair of its Board of Trustees. Before his retirement he served as the Dean of the College, Deputy Provost, and Director of International House at the University of Chicago.

"... there are many other rituals that people in Kelomal think are very important; these rituals treat deities whose characters and powers are very diverse, and whose modes of worship are quite different from one another. The Bengalis often say, in uncharacteristic understatement, baro mase tero parban, 'In twelve months there are thirteen rituals.' I have taken the title of this book from that expression." -Ralph Nicholas

Dates: 
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 5:30am
International House

COSAS and SALC Anniversary Conference: Sites of South Asian Studies

COSAS and SALC Anniversary Conference: Sites of South Asian Studies

Thursday, April 28: Opening address by Richard Davis
Friday, April 29: Keynote address by Sheldon Pollock

Dates: 
Thursday, April 28, 2016 (All day) to Saturday, April 30, 2016 (All day)
Swift Hall

Seeking New Identity and Voice: Dalit Movements in Tamil Nadu

Lecture by A. P. Anbuselvam, Dalit Resource Centre, Tamil Nadu Theological Seminary & Madras Institute of Development Studies

The Dalit student bodies in college campuses bring to focus the conflict of Dalit identity with other political identities such as the Indian, Dravidian and Tamil as well as the Dalit perspective on the oppressive caste structure and the need for its elimination. A look at these is essential to understand the increasing violence in campuses and towns, whether it is about political assertiveness or marriage across caste.

Dates: 
Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 12:00pm
Kelly 114

Smart Lecture

Lecture given by Kavita Singh, School of Arts and Aesthetics, JNU.

Dates: 
Monday, April 18, 2016 - 4:30pm
CWAC

Smart Lecture

Lecture given by Crispin Branfoot, Senior Lecturer in South Asian Art and Archaeology, SOAS, University of London.

Dates: 
Thursday, April 14, 2016 - 4:30pm
Cochrane Woods Art Center

Nayaka Studies Workshop

The so-called Nāyaka period, roughly the mid-16th through the 18th centuries, is, according to Noboru Karshima, “something akin to a black hole in south Indian history.” This period immediately preceding the rise of colonial power, and after the fall of Vijayanagara, is of interest because it is the period that that witnesses major transformations in literature, architecture, merchant activity, the organization of maṭhas, the expression of royal power, and religious practices. An interdisciplinary workshop that brings together diverse perspectives and expertise will provide the context for rethinking this vital period. In so doing, we begin to reimagine the place of early modern South India not only in Indian history, but in global early modern studies.

Keynote Address by Crispin Branfoot (4:30pm, Cochrane-Woods 157). Please see attached for a full schedule of the workshop.

Dates: 
Thursday, April 14, 2016 (All day) to Saturday, April 16, 2016 (All day)
Thursday, April 14, Cochrane-Woods 157; Friday, April 15 & Saturday April 16, Classics 110

Lecture

Lecture by Francis Robinson, Mellon Islamic Studies Visiting Professor in the Dept. of South Asian Languages & Civilizations and in the Division of the Humanities and the College.

Dates: 
Tuesday, March 8, 2016 (All day)

South Asia Graduate Student Conference: Dying in South Asia

We invite papers on issues related to the idea of death, which we define in its very broadest sense. Taking death literally, we can speak of the processes and events attendant to the gradual extinction of living creatures but also of languages, texts, memories, species or even traditions. Metaphorically, death can help us to think through distinct South Asian histories of violence, impasse and loss. Yet this can also enable accompanying conversations on the possibility of recovery, resurrection and redemption. We seek to explore phenomena that resist death and the sense of an ending, including practices of ritual, memory, nostalgia and revivalism.

Dates: 
Thursday, March 3, 2016 (All day) to Friday, March 4, 2016 (All day)

“From Morality to Psychology: Emotion Concepts in Urdu, 1870-1920”

Talk by Margrit Pernau.

This paper will look at the change in the concepts these men used to write about emotions in Urdu between 1870 and 1920. It argues that while emotions at the beginning of the period were still thought of as premised upon notions of equilibrium and balance, which accorded a crucial role to the will and to rationality, fifty years later concepts celebrated the elementary power of emotions and their capacity to overwhelm the individual. This can be read as an indicator and at the same time as a factor of a profound emotionalization of private as well as public life.

Dates: 
Friday, February 26, 2016 - 12:00pm
Foster Hall 103

“Slow Descent into Digital Hell: How the Moving Image Is Coping with Digital India”

Lecture given by Ashish Rajadhyaksha.

The public process of making and showing movies provided one of the major institutions of democratic modernity in 20th-century India. As India enters a new era of digital governance, the shift to digital filmmaking and exhibition is transforming the essentially political practices that the cinema created. Ashish Rajadhyaksha looks at Bollywood films and accompanying video games, independent cinema, and key works in experimental video in the context of these changes in India’s massive moving image industry.

Dates: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 5:00pm
Logan Center for the Arts

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